Natal
teeth removal
 

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The definition of natal teeth

Natal
teeth are teeth that already exist in the baby’s mouth at birth, which is a very
rare condition. The teeth are often in the front and have a short root.
Some studies show that the
incidence of natal teeth are at least 1 in 3000 births.

The difference between natal teeth
and neonatal teeth

If
the teeth are not present when the baby is born and only erupt after the first
months, then they are called neonatal teeth.

Neonatal teeth are teeth that come out through the gingiva after the first
months of the baby’s life.

When do neonatal teeth start to come out?
Neonatal teeth start to erupt from the age of 6 months, sometimes it can take
longer, depending on many factors like genetics and nutrition.
Generally, the first teeth that erupt are the lower central incisors, in rare cases
the upper central incisors can erupt first.

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After the eruption of the first incisors, the following teeth start to come out
in the following sequence: 

Types of natal teeth

1-
Short crown teeth with only the tip emerging from the gingiva.

2- Fully developed teeth with root structure.

3- Partially developed teeth without root structure.
4- Fully developed crown without root.
5- Tooth residues that stick to gums.

Causes of natal teeth

Researches
show that in most of the time, natal teeth are not related to medical conditions, but in
some cases babies were diagnosed with: 



Ellis–van
Creveld syndrome
:
a rare genetic disorder of
the skeletal dysplasia type.

Hallermann–Streiff
syndrome
:
  a congenital disorder that affects
growth, cranial development, hair growth and dental
development.

Pierre Robin syndrome:
is a congenital defect observed in humans which is characterized
by facial abnormalities.

Sotos syndrome: is
a rare genetic disorder characterized by excessive physical growth during the
first years of life.

Endocrine disturbances: It is
thought to be because of excessive secretion of the pituitary, thyroid or
gonads.

-Osteoblastic activity within the
area of the tooth germ.

-Infection: For example, congenital
syphilis appears to have varying effect; in some cases, it has erupted early,
while in Others it has been retarded.

Nutritional deficiency, e.g.,
hypovitaminosis
(which in turn is caused by poor maternal health, endocrine
disturbances, febrile episodes, pyelitis during pregnancy, and congenital
syphilis).

Febrile status: Fever, exanthemata
during pregnancy tend to accelerate eruption as they do in various other
processes.

-Superficial position of the tooth germ.

Though the etiology is not known, approximately 15% had parents, siblings, or other near relatives with a history of natal. In several well-documented cases, the inheritance pattern has been that of an autosomal dominant trait.

Reasons to visit the dentist

  • Potential
    risk of the infant inhaling the tooth due to great mobility.
  • Ulceration
    of the tongue or lips.
  • Difficulty
    in feeding.
  • Ulceration
    to the nipple of the mother.

 

Treatment of natal teeth: Natal
teeth removal



When to perform a natal teeth
removal?

– Fully developed teeth with root: in this case, no intervention is advised,
unless it is harming the baby or the mother. They also shouldn’t be removed if
the baby is diagnosed with  
hypoprothrombinemia.

– Loose
natal teeth: in most cases, natal teeth are loose and without long roots, which
makes them dangerous for your baby because of swallowing risk, gum injuries,
bleeding, feeding and nutrition problems. In this case it is recommended to
extract them.

 The
natal teeth removal is done by a general or pediatric dentist, a dental x-ray
may be indicated and the extraction can be without anesthesia if the tooth is
loose. A sterile compress is applied after and is not left in the baby’s mouth
to avoid the risk of swallowing.

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